Our Mobility investigates the psychology of daily transportation experiences and seeks to understand how our transportation systems support (or fail to support) our basic psychological needs. We also want to understand how environmental, social, and economic factors influence motivation, behavior, daily experiences, and emotions, and if there is any variation due to disability, gender, income, or age.

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Who’s involved?

Photo of Jessica Murray holding a sign in front of a rally. The sign reads, "Elevators are for everyone" and shows iconic drawings of people in different elevators. The first shows a person with crutches and a person rolling a suitcase. The second has a pregnant woman, a baby in a stroller, a person with a heart condition, and a child. The third shows a woman with a child and a person in a wheelchair. The last one shows a person with a cane, and a person rolling a dolly with packages. The graphic and text has a rainbow gradient, symbolizing inclusiveness. The mposter was designed by Jessica Murray for a rally outside of an MTA board meeting in July, 2017. She hopes they will consider the diverse cross-section of the population that needs elevators.Jessica Murray is a Ph.D. candidate at The Graduate Center, CUNY. She researches access to transportation as a critical environmental factor for human development. She also advocates for improving accessibility in the NYC subway.

 

 

 


ARDRAW LogoOurMobility is supported by Policy Research, Inc., Analyzing Relationships Between Disability, Rehabilitation, and Work (ARDRAW) Small Grant Program, through a WTS/TransitCenter Transit Policy Innovator Graduate Scholarship,

and through a Digital Dissertation Award from the New Media Lab at The Graduate Center, CUNY, a Digital Innovation Grant through the Graduate Center Digital Initiatives (GCDI), and an Early Research Initiative Grant from the Provost’s Office at The Graduate Center, CUNY